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Cost Of Hiv Drugs In Singapore

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Guest jericho

Officially no.

But two person have been cure of Aids in this world already after they have contracted it.

One is a man and one is a child.

So what does it mean?

There is a cure in this world but they won't give it to the world because of greed.

RA strikes again with another glorious display of his stupidity.

Facts all wrong about the application of the treatment for the guy who was cured (the same bone marrow transplant treatment was applied to 6 others and failed, but they r still trying) and the child, (who has since unfortunately relapsed).

Always selective in his choice of information to suit his preconceived mindset, and to top it all RA continues to show he is terrible in English grammar.

Thanks again for the entertainment!

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Guest Raiden Alpha

RA strikes again with another glorious display of his stupidity.

Facts all wrong about the application of the treatment for the guy who was cured (the same bone marrow transplant treatment was applied to 6 others and failed, but they r still trying) and the child, (who has since unfortunately relapsed).

Always selective in his choice of information to suit his preconceived mindset, and to top it all RA continues to show he is terrible in English grammar.

Thanks again for the entertainment!

Incurable mean no matter what you do you can't cure it.

The fact that the Berlin patient is able to rid his aids away mean it is curable.

You talk so much cock about application and treatment method for what?

All these cases are cracks in reality that show people the possible in the impossible.

Your mind is heavily handicapped and restricted by your unwillingness to confront and accept it.

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Guest jericho

Omg. Bad grammar and dont understand english...poor thing.

But lets get back to topic.

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Guest Raiden Alpha

Omg. Bad grammar and dont understand english...poor thing.

But lets get back to topic.

This is for chicken backside like you.

"#1 rule in arguments.

If you are losing,start correcting their grammars."

Refute my point lah if you are capable of doing so instead of turning into a grammar nazi and go change the topic.

"Berlin patient" is cure of aids regardless of what you say.

Lol

You sai.

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Guest peter

I am sorry I am out of topic.

I want to ask if somebody had exposure to hiv person, 

what test we can take in Singapore to test the hiv status post exposure 38 days or more ?

Thank you

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Guest Safe

It's jus an immune disorder nowadays, no need to worry...

As for cost of drugs, u can apply for assistance with the hospital, they won't refuse any help to u!

U r very safe indeed!

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I went with my friend to CDC before after he got tested positive and need to report to CDC to have a talk with a health officer there.

Mm from what I heard after he come out,they say HIV patients lifespan is almost the same as a normal person as long as you CAN AFFORD the medicines.

With the new medications available nowadays you can even regress aids status back into HIV status by fighting off the opportunistic infections and bring the T cells count to a low level.

Michael Jordan the basket ball player who got aids in the early 90s is still around til this day.

But the thing is medication cost,my friend earn 1.4k only...

Good luck for those within this income group and below.

No ill will or malice intended out,just being grim realistic.

HIV/Aids is a rich man disease.

 

Shame, SHAME SINGAPORE!  A rich country for the rich.  An indifferent country for the poor.

 

I just read in the last TIME magazine (Dec. 1) an article "The End of Aids"  that describes the efforts made in San Francisco to end HIV transmission there.  Not only are they trying to make testing mandatory, but those who test positive will receive the medications free and will be strongly encouraged to start the treatment immediately.  Early detection and treatment prevents much damage to the immune system and it will not let it degrade to the point of Aids.  Also by having the virus quickly become undetectable, its transmission to other people will be much harder.

 

Another thing:  these people in San Francisco who have lived the whole story of HIV in and out have the right attitude of stripping  HIV infection of ANY FUCKING MORAL ISSUE !  No shame for those who happened to get infected but are diligent helping themselves to remain healthy. 

 

If San Francisco can do this,  Singapore can also.  If money would be an issue (only a vile excuse in SG) I would even welcome to see in your island the assets of all the Christian churches and organizations expropriated and used to finance a similar program. I think Jesus Christ would fully agree to this. And your island is well suited for this action, with a small population well contained at its natural borders, and at the few points of entry all people arriving, tourists or other, could be tested for HIV and if infected they must start full treatment to gain entrance or turn around and leave. (I don't think that a minor reduction in civil, personal rights would be noticeable in Singapore)

Edited by Steve5380

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Guest globus

Hi hotspunk

I know teevir but prefer to take atripla. Not sure if you stock it?

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Hi Globus,

 

No, I don't stock Atripla.

I have Teevir (generic version) which my clients are on and all doing well. We go for regular blood tests.

As long as viral load indicator remains undetectable, it means the (generic) medication is working for us.

 

Do drop me a line if u have any other queries.

 

Regards,

Hotspunk

97531592

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Guest You r covered

I got mine sponsored by Ttsh hospital, so dun worry about the money.

They won't leave u without assess to medication!

No need to worry at all everyone.

You are covered!

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Guest Raiden Alpha

I got mine sponsored by Ttsh hospital, so dun worry about the money.

They won't leave u without assess to medication!

No need to worry at all everyone.

You are covered!

You might want to elaborate more on how you got sponsor by the hospital to get your HIV medications.

Things like who do you approach?

Which department and what are the steps to applying for medical assistance etc.

More details rather than a few vague sentence of assurance from a anonymous Internet commenter is much more credible and will instil more public confidence that people won't be outcast and left to die alone should they contracted aids/hiv.

I am HIV negative but everytime I have sex the worry of contracting aids/hiv did flash across my mind. I'm sure many people have this worry too.

I have always been curious and concern about this disease ever since I accompany one of my HIV positive friend to CDC to talk with a medical officer there.

From what I heard it's very expensive.

The blood tests to determine T cell count and to find out what type of medications is suitable for a positive person and the lifelong monthly cost of medications itself.

This is what I am curious about.

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Guest Social work

You might want to elaborate more on how you got sponsor by the hospital to get your HIV medications.

Things like who do you approach?

Which department and what are the steps to applying for medical assistance etc.

More details rather than a few vague sentence of assurance from a anonymous Internet commenter is much more credible and will instil more public confidence that people won't be outcast and left to die alone should they contracted aids/hiv.

I am HIV negative but everytime I have sex the worry of contracting aids/hiv did flash across my mind. I'm sure many people have this worry too.

I have always been curious and concern about this disease ever since I accompany one of my HIV positive friend to CDC to talk with a medical officer there.

From what I heard it's very expensive.

The blood tests to determine T cell count and to find out what type of medications is suitable for a positive person and the lifelong monthly cost of medications itself.

This is what I am curious about.

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From what I know, any HIV patient will have a social worker designated for him/her. As the patient would see the doctor/nurses/social worker/medical staffs lifelong, the hospital would have a fixed arrangement.

 

Hospitals themselves do not have funds to assist HIV patients. Financial help would be through Medisave, Medifund and other ministry-supported sources. These financial aid don't last forever, they have to be re-applied and subjected to approval every 6 months or so. And they rarely cover 100% of costs.

 

Without any subsidy: One month supply of patented medicine at the hospital price is $450+. The regular blood tests which happens every 2 to 6 months (based on the doctor's assessment) is $300+ per visit. The initial once-off full blood and virus resistance test is around $950+.

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Guest Raiden Alpha

From what I know, any HIV patient will have a social worker designated for him/her. As the patient would see the doctor/nurses/social worker/medical staffs lifelong, the hospital would have a fixed arrangement.

Hospitals themselves do not have funds to assist HIV patients. Financial help would be through Medisave, Medifund and other ministry-supported sources. These financial aid don't last forever, they have to be re-applied and subjected to approval every 6 months or so. And they rarely cover 100% of costs.

Without any subsidy: One month supply of patented medicine at the hospital price is $450+. The regular blood tests which happens every 2 to 6 months (based on the doctor's assessment) is $300+ per visit. The initial once-off full blood and virus resistance test is around $950+.

Woah scary.

At least other medical ailments are covered by insurance but this particular one is not.

We all know what kind of wage most working class is earning nowadays in this era.

I wonder if there are Singaporeans who are denied of treatment or given up on seeking treatment because of economic considerations.

This reply is much more starker and informative than the previous one that are largely gloss over.

People please safe sex always ok.

This disease is like a death sentence here in this country for the average folks.

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Guest Raiden Alpha

From what I know, any HIV patient will have a social worker designated for him/her. As the patient would see the doctor/nurses/social worker/medical staffs lifelong, the hospital would have a fixed arrangement.

Hospitals themselves do not have funds to assist HIV patients. Financial help would be through Medisave, Medifund and other ministry-supported sources. These financial aid don't last forever, they have to be re-applied and subjected to approval every 6 months or so. And they rarely cover 100% of costs.

Without any subsidy: One month supply of patented medicine at the hospital price is $450+. The regular blood tests which happens every 2 to 6 months (based on the doctor's assessment) is $300+ per visit. The initial once-off full blood and virus resistance test is around $950+.

Steve 5380

You see this?

This is the real Singapore for you.

Sad isn't it.

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Guest Raiden Alpha

Why are gay saunas still allow to operate in Singapore despite knowing the risk of exposing people to HIV/aids virus is there and the medical protocols for HIV/aids patients is consider lacking/inadequate at the moment to provide optimal healthcare and support for HIV/aids patients?

I wonder what the authorities and ministry of health are thinking all these years.

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Steve 5380

You see this?

This is the real Singapore for you.

Sad isn't it.

Indeed, RA, quite sad.

This virus that can be deadly or at least cause a lot of damage is allowed to roam free among the population, while some individual who happens to be caught entering the country with a small amount of drugs, which may not be as damaging as the HIV virus, is promptly put to death.

I remember years ago when I participated in a church chorus, one young guy in our group stopped coming and soon it was known that he was dying from AIDS. One of the elders who went to visit him, came back all perplexed: "I don't understand how a person like him CHOOSES to get in that situation" (translated, how can he decide to get so sinful that he ends up like that)

There must be a large fraction of the SG population who think the same.

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Guest K Sayra sayra

Dun worry, b happy

K sayra sayra

Whatever will b will b

They will never leave u to die

I promise!

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Indeed, RA, quite sad.

This virus that can be deadly or at least cause a lot of damage is allowed to roam free among the population, while some individual who happens to be caught entering the country with a small amount of drugs, which may not be as damaging as the HIV virus, is promptly put to death.

I remember years ago when I participated in a church chorus, one young guy in our group stopped coming and soon it was known that he was dying from AIDS. One of the elders who went to visit him, came back all perplexed: "I don't understand how a person like him CHOOSES to get in that situation" (translated, how can he decide to get so sinful that he ends up like that)

There must be a large fraction of the SG population who think the same.

 

I presume your point is that the government is not handling HIV adequately. I might have to disagree. Any foreign citizen entering Singapore on Visa has to be HIV negative, and positive individuals are banned from entering even if they are under medication. While I feel that such measures are too unfair to those individuals, it does show how the government is containing the situation. The government cannot force every citizen to have regular blood tests, nor would it be economical for the country. Even if the government shuts down saunas, casual sex is still pervasive in the lgbt community (not to mention, the straight population). It is impossible to track down and stop the spread of HIV unlike the distribution of narcotics, so it isn't like the government "allowed" HIV to roam free per se.

 

It's true more has to be done to educate the population. However the onus should not be on the government alone, as the society plays a greater role. That's why we should help AFA and help the lgbt community by propagating the right mindset with HIV and HIV patients.

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I presume your point is that the government is not handling HIV adequately. I might have to disagree. Any foreign citizen entering Singapore on Visa has to be HIV negative, and positive individuals are banned from entering even if they are under medication. While I feel that such measures are too unfair to those individuals, it does show how the government is containing the situation. The government cannot force every citizen to have regular blood tests, nor would it be economical for the country. Even if the government shuts down saunas, casual sex is still pervasive in the lgbt community (not to mention, the straight population). It is impossible to track down and stop the spread of HIV unlike the distribution of narcotics, so it isn't like the government "allowed" HIV to roam free per se.

 

It's true more has to be done to educate the population. However the onus should not be on the government alone, as the society plays a greater role. That's why we should help AFA and help the lgbt community by propagating the right mindset with HIV and HIV patients.

I reiterate my position that your government is not handling HIV adequately.

To require being HIV negative to obtain a visa is an abuse. The rule should be to have HIV 'UNDETECTABLE', which is something in reach of HIV positive individuals who can afford to travel to your expensive island. And a majority of visitors don't require a visa. I have entered SG countless times, and never had to apply for a visa (US citizen). Any American could come into SG loaded with HIV virus, for example.

Here is a quotation from an article in Fridae in 2010:

"Bloomberg BusinessWeek reported yesterday that Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine for her co-discovery of the virus that causes AIDS, criticised Singapore for the lack of free treatment of HIV, saying this added to the stigma and burden of being HIV positive, and very likely drives the disease further underground.

She compared Singapore to her home country of France and developing countries where HIV treatment is free, and said the situation in Singapore is "very difficult to accept". "The situation is even worse than in developing countries not far from here. In Cambodia, everything is free."

In Singapore, the cost of HIV treatment is high because generic versions of commonly prescribed anti-retrovirals are not available. And the reason generics are not imported here is because of TRIPS, an agreement to protect and enforce intellectual property rights, in particular those of the largest pharmaceutical companies, which in turn are one of the largest contributors to Singapore's economy by industry. According to the Biomedical Sciences Factsheet 2009 published by the Singapore Economic Development Board, the Singapore government has invested in more than S$5 billion (US$3.5 billion) in building up the industry and in turn, the biomedical sciences industry in 2008 contributed S$19 billion (US$12.7 billion) or 7.6% of Singapore’s total manufacturing output. So why provoke the ire of Big Pharma when we've already done so much to woo them here? Think of how much revenue they generate for Singapore!

- See more at: http://www.fridae.asia/gay-news/2010/03/05/9712.singapores-hiv-aids-treatment-dilemma-multi-pronged-strategy-needed#sthash.65SKfIis.dpuf"

Now, this is from four years ago. Maybe things have improved somewhat.

But this surely contradicts your statement that "the onus should not be on the government alone". Are you the OWNER of your government?

Governments can play the biggest, sometimes the exclusive role in issues like this one.

After all, your government plays the exclusive role... in your military. And this doesn't cure anybody.

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I reiterate my position that your government is not handling HIV adequately.

To require being HIV negative to obtain a visa is an abuse. The rule should be to have HIV 'UNDETECTABLE', which is something in reach of HIV positive individuals who can afford to travel to your expensive island. And a majority of visitors don't require a visa. I have entered SG countless times, and never had to apply for a visa (US citizen). Any American could come into SG loaded with HIV virus, for example.

Here is a quotation from an article in Fridae in 2010:

"Bloomberg BusinessWeek reported yesterday that Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine for her co-discovery of the virus that causes AIDS, criticised Singapore for the lack of free treatment of HIV, saying this added to the stigma and burden of being HIV positive, and very likely drives the disease further underground.

She compared Singapore to her home country of France and developing countries where HIV treatment is free, and said the situation in Singapore is "very difficult to accept". "The situation is even worse than in developing countries not far from here. In Cambodia, everything is free."

In Singapore, the cost of HIV treatment is high because generic versions of commonly prescribed anti-retrovirals are not available. And the reason generics are not imported here is because of TRIPS, an agreement to protect and enforce intellectual property rights, in particular those of the largest pharmaceutical companies, which in turn are one of the largest contributors to Singapore's economy by industry. According to the Biomedical Sciences Factsheet 2009 published by the Singapore Economic Development Board, the Singapore government has invested in more than S$5 billion (US$3.5 billion) in building up the industry and in turn, the biomedical sciences industry in 2008 contributed S$19 billion (US$12.7 billion) or 7.6% of Singapore’s total manufacturing output. So why provoke the ire of Big Pharma when we've already done so much to woo them here? Think of how much revenue they generate for Singapore!

- See more at: http://www.fridae.asia/gay-news/2010/03/05/9712.singapores-hiv-aids-treatment-dilemma-multi-pronged-strategy-needed#sthash.65SKfIis.dpuf"

Now, this is from four years ago. Maybe things have improved somewhat.

But this surely contradicts your statement that "the onus should not be on the government alone". Are you the OWNER of your government?

Governments can play the biggest, sometimes the exclusive role in issues like this one.

After all, your government plays the exclusive role... in your military. And this doesn't cure anybody.

 

I feel that you are making unfair comparisons again. Like narcotics, the military is nothing like HIV control. Should there be no army, are citizens able to take up arms, learn warfare and be militia? I doubt so. On the other hand, if the government doesn't give free HIV treatment, can the society do something about the stigma and burden of being HIV positive? Yes we can. Just because the government plays the biggest or the exclusive role in some things doesn't mean they should play the biggest or the exclusive role in everything. I agree free treatment for HIV patients would be wonderful, but isn't free anything wonderful?

 

And as we continue to propagate the idea that the onus to change anything is on the government alone, more people will forget that they have the power to change Singapore for the better. People criticize the government for what they are doing insufficiently, yet few steps out to make a difference. This is why we lack activists, volunteers and donors here.

 

The SOCIETY is the owner of the government.

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Guest Raiden Alpha

I feel that you are making unfair comparisons again. Like narcotics, the military is nothing like HIV control. Should there be no army, are citizens able to take up arms, learn warfare and be militia? I doubt so. On the other hand, if the government doesn't give free HIV treatment, can the society do something about the stigma and burden of being HIV positive? Yes we can. Just because the government plays the biggest or the exclusive role in some things doesn't mean they should play the biggest or the exclusive role in everything. I agree free treatment for HIV patients would be wonderful, but isn't free anything wonderful?

And as we continue to propagate the idea that the onus to change anything is on the government alone, more people will forget that they have the power to change Singapore for the better. People criticize the government for what they are doing insufficiently, yet few steps out to make a difference. This is why we lack activists, volunteers and donors here.

The SOCIETY is the owner of the government.

But Steve did point out that because of TRIPS agreement Singapore have to protect industry and investors intellectual property rights and in doing so have cause generic drugs derivatives to be off limit in local healthcare and pharmectuical industry.

You are emphasising on society social awareness/acceptance on HIV/Aids patients while Steve is pointing out a fact that because of Sg government desire for economic profits it has actually become a challenge for HIV sufferers to get proper adequate medical care.

Either HIV sufferers are rich enough to get their own medicine here at high price or they get it outside through third party suppliers or apply for medical assistance.

These complicated medical protocols have in a sense add unnecessary stress and stigma to HIV sufferers which is not humane nor is it really a nice situation for them to be caught in.

It shouldn't be this way.

I find it cruel.

As a side note I have a chronic medical condition resulting in renal complications and have to take medications to control my illness thus in a sense I can more or less relate or understand the frustration of HIV/Aids patients for not being able to get cheaper alternative generic medications and need to fork out high price for legitimate copyright drugs.

It is a killer on people pocket if their health insurance does not provide coverage for certain medical ailments.

There is a clearly a conflict of interest here on the government side because in order to protect pharmectuical intellectual property rights in Singapore they are actually placing Singaporeans health risk and health care at a secondary priority in favour of money.

This is terrible.

The more one is aware of what is going on in this country under the current reigning party governance the more shocking it is to digest and stomach in all these facts.

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Guest Raiden Alpha

Cheaper because those are generic brand medicines right?

Good to know you are helping these HIV patients to lessen their financial burden.

And I have nothing against your doing at all in fact I find it is good for those with HIV too.

What I want to say though is I feel hospitals themselves should also sell cheaper generic brand medicines too.

But wait,they can't because this country government have sign a TRIPS agreement to protect patents and intellectual property rights of their foreign investors.

That's why generic and piracies are actively ban and suppress here in Singapore and cheap generic drugs can only be bought through third party avenues.

I wonder why Aids organisations and humanitarians have not grill and flame the government yet for their doings?

Pap is so evil to the point that they can disregard human lives for the sake of earning money.

Edited by Raiden Alpha

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Guest Raiden Alpha

How does one get into this line?

How many aids/hiv patients are there in this country and how many sellers are there?

If the market is not too saturated maybe I can sell too and made a living out of it.

Is it good earning?

No malice intend just purely asking questions because my entrepreneurship is activated.

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Dear Raiden Alpha,

 

AIDS Organizations and Activists here continue to work tirelessly with our government agencies to reduce the number of new HIV infections, AIDS-related deaths and various forms of stigma and discrimination faced by people living with HIV (PLHIVs).

A lot of the work is done behind closed doors, where its easier to get things done :) 

 

From no subsidies for medication, to some and various forms of subsidy depending on means testing. We have come a long way.

However, the optimum solution is still free medication, as all Singaporeans have a right to Health, not withstanding TRIPS and FTAs, etc.

 

For those in a position to make a difference, hear ye:

1. There must be complete removal of punitive laws that criminalize PLHIVs based on medical condition. This is a violation of human rights. We are not the enemy. The virus is. And as soon as those in authority realize this, then this is a step closer to wining the battle against HIV/AIDS.

 

2. There must be laws enacted to protect PLHIVs, those with disabilities and minority groups from all forms of discrimination. This is especially so at the workplaces to protect us from losing jobs, which will impact our ability to fund our medication, which will directly affect our health condition.

Many delay treatment (49% newly diagnosed every year) before they are diagnosed at late stage HIV/AIDS, with opportunistic infections and AIDS related complications. I was one of the statistics, but am better now as I am on treatment.  

 

3. Travel restrictions of PLHIVs must be lifted. In other words, Singapore should continue to allow skilled foreigners into work, as long as they are "undetectable" and able to afford their own medication. Foreigners do not burden our healthcare system, since they/their employers pay full rates at hospitals, compared with citzens/PRs who enjoy various subsidies.

 

4. Other discriminatory practices already mentioned by others, is non coverage of HIV in insurance policies. So PLHIVs have to fork out tons of $$ for their other related health conditions because if its HIV related, then $0 payout!

 

 

Raiden, to answer your question on entrepreneurship, it would be good to be a person living with HIV, to get into this line of business :)

This is so that you understand better what your customers are going through, can identify with, and are able to afford free counseling services at the same time.

Also, one has to be non-judgmental when interacting with customers and have a listening ear.

In addition, you have to learn all the various medicine names and combination therapies that customers are on and able to advise how to cope with and expect various side effects arising from the different (over 20) medicines.  

 

The market is not saturated. There are a few suppliers out there. But here's the deal :)

As government (MOH) rolls out more subsidies, fewer customers will come to you.

For example, when medifund was rolled out in 2010 to PLHIVs who were unemployed or earning below a certain salary, suppliers lost 1/3 of our customers.

Then as more suppliers come on board, prices fall as competition is more keen for market share. Profit margins thin significantly.

Certainly this is good for the patient. But not for the supplier.

 

I got into this business not only for profit, but for altruistic reasons. If we don't help our own affected community, who will? I tell this to many of my customers.

I hope one day, I will be out of a job, once a cure is found for PLHIVs and a vaccine for those who are HIV negative. 

However, clinical research and trials are time consuming and can take up to years.

We all echo, hopefully we live to see the end of HIV/AIDS.

 

Besides, Healthcare is the main responsibility of our government. As suppliers, what we do should be only a temporary/stop-gap measure.

 

Peace & Love,

Hotspunk.

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Guest Raiden Alpha

Thank you Hotspunk for your sincere and passionate reply. :)

Really appreciate your time in addressing my enquires.

Now I understand it's not as easy as it seem.

But don't worry I still don't believe PAP will deny you or anyone of a job in this area and cause you all to become jobless.

Hell will freeze over if this white mafia gang is willing to forsake making money and looking at governing this country and caring for the unfortunate from a altruistic and compassionate angle.

Take care and have a good night ahead.

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i recently discovered i got HIV. Any advise on where i could go to seek financial assistance for my hiv medication? Its like $810 a month ! Was so shocked when the pharmacist told me the price at NUH.

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Guest Guest

i recently discovered i got HIV. Any advise on where i could go to seek financial assistance for my hiv medication? Its like $810 a month ! Was so shocked when the pharmacist told me the price at NUHI

My friend got HIV too. He told me that HIV medicine is cheaper in Bangkok than Singpore. He can afford to buy HIV medicine in Bangkok than Singapore. He still is healthy for more than 10 years now. 

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Guest hotspunk

Dear Steamfish and Guest,
 
NUH pharmacist's duty is to sell you branded (expensive) medication. No Singaporean in his/her right mind will pay such ridiculous prices, if there are alternatives.
FYI, it cost $910 for branded Truvada (a 2 drug fixed dose combination tablet) at SGH. wtf !
 
If you ask around there are some doctors, nurses and medical social workers at NUH who know me already. I've emailed them my price list of generic ARV medication sometime back. Unfortunately, information is not always disseminated across to the rest.
 
For those who can afford to travel to Bangkok, yes medication is much cheaper there, because you are buying generics there as well.
But do remember to factor in cost of airfare, accommodation, food, local transport, massage, etc :P
 
For those who are cost conscious, there are local suppliers/buyer's club available. We provide cheaper generics which are as effective as branded medication.
We know this because we go for our regular blood tests and as long as our viral load remains undetectable, it means our medication is working well. At undetectable levels, you cannot transmit the virus to others and hence do not infect others.
 
I've been on medication since 2002. I celebrate my 13 years on treatment this April and thank God I am alive,healthy and well.
Steamfish, I'll PM you and we can chat further....
 
Best wishes and Happy Valentines to all.
 
Hotspunk
<mobile removed by Mod>

==============

Mod's note :

Dear Mr. Spunk,

Although we do not allow ads on discussion topics, I am allowing this ad as I think it would help fellow poz guys on where to get the needed meds for their condition.

1. Please use your registered account to post to prevent trolls from posting using your nick.

2. Those who wants info please go to the Biz and Service link

3. Please follow the rules here in our forum because I will come down hard on rule breakers.

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Dear Steamfish,

 

Get a referral to TTSH CDC. It is cheaper there and can be paid through Medisave. I am surprise at the price you are paying. However, there are different types of medication for different level of infection. Normally they start with all-in-one Combination Tablets before progressing to other types of meds. There are information found online, http://www.aidsmeds.com/, a US site. Check out for more information. Hope the info helps.

 

Keep calm and stay strong. :)

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--- 

For those who can afford to travel to Bangkok, yes medication is much cheaper there, because you are buying generics there as well.

But do remember to factor in cost of airfare, accommodation, food, local transport, massage, etc :P

 

For those who are cost conscious, there are local suppliers/buyer's club available. We provide cheaper generics which are as effective as branded medication.

We know this because we go for our regular blood tests and as long as our viral load remains undetectable, it means our medication is working well. At undetectable levels, you cannot transmit the virus to others and hence do not infect others.

 

I've been on medication since 2002. I celebrate my 13 years on treatment this April and thank God I am alive,healthy and well.

----

 

Hotspunk, good work!   People like you make up for a conservative, indifferent, semi-totalitarian government that does not take adequate care of its population.

 

Thanks to modern medication HIV is today a chronic condition among the mildest ones.  Take the medicine, and you are practically 100%.  Your 13 years on treatment can become 50 years on treatment if necessary, but hopefully you don't have to wait so long for a cure.

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Hi Steve,

 

Thanks for your words of encouragement.

Yes, we live in exciting times. No one is dying from AIDS now, as it is controllable with powerful anti-retrovirals (ARVs).

Medicines are becoming more affordable now through various buyer's clubs and suppliers out there, myself being one of them.

 

You may like to know that, at clinical testing stages now are LAAs, long acting antivirals.

These are injectibles where patients see their doc once a month or once in three months and get an injection, like a flu jab.

This replaces the need to take daily doses of medicines.

 

Best wishes,

 

Hotspunk.

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Your ad had already been added in my note to you.

 

You don't have to post it here again.

 

Your post will be removed as the Main forum is a place for discussion Not Ads.

 

Thank you for your understanding.

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Guest doncoin

I am not sure how the situation is exactly in Singapore, but it is relatively common for the pharmaceutical companies in the US to subsidise the costs of the meds as well. I.e. Pzfizer is known to help cover the costs for qualified patients. Whatever "qualified" means, it is something your doctor can tell you. 

 

I.e. My insurance will not cover 100% of my PrEP, but between that and the subsidy from the pharmaceutical company, the cost became more manageable. 

 

So, for those worried about the costs of HIV meds, do reach out to the pharmaceutical company and see what happens. 

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Anyone who needs anti-viral medicine (generic) at non-profit price may contact me.  I know a Protestant bishop who has set up an agency to bring in these drugs for people with AIDS who cannot afford the expensive proprietary medication.  

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Why are gay saunas still allow to operate in Singapore despite knowing the risk of exposing people to HIV/aids virus is there and the medical protocols for HIV/aids patients is consider lacking/inadequate at the moment to provide optimal healthcare and support for HIV/aids patients?

I wonder what the authorities and ministry of health are thinking all these years.

"What's wrong with collecting more money?" doctrine. Just let these people continue to believe that they needed these drugs (aka harmful chemicals) which cost only a few cents to manufacture. cui bono?

Edited by 过客

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I am going to hiv test soon,does anyone can tell me how long can we live as we diagnosed hiv+

You can live as long as you can live as long as you do not put more harmful chemicals into your body to stress your immune system. There are numerous reports of HIV+ people living healthily and actively for more than 20 years. These people ask questions and do research before popping any pills.

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You can live as long as you can live as long as you do not put more harmful chemicals into your body to stress your immune system. There are numerous reports of HIV+ people living healthily and actively for more than 20 years. These people ask questions and do research before popping any pills.

 

Are you referring to the modern medicines to suppress the HIV virus?  Are they "harmful chemicals"?  What would you do if you have HIV?  Wait 20 years without treatment?

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Look up Urine Therapy and check the testimonials.  Your own pee.  I practise safe sex but never know when an infection can occur and it can be any STDs, skin rash or whatever. 

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Guest Jason212

Hi Guys, I recently found out that i'm POV. I'm lost about the option for medical treatment. My primary concern is should I seek treatment in SG? because from what I understand, the ministry will be informed and I wonder if it will affect my job. 2nd, Should I decide to seek treatment in Bangkok, any recommendation on hospital/doctor? any info would be very helpful. Thank you and I appreciate your reply. - Jason.

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Guest thomas

Is it really true that HIV is now just a chronic condition and HIV + people can live as long as normal people as long as you can afford the treament?

Or are we just trying to sound positive and encouraging?

 

Someone above said nobody dies of full blown AIDS nowadays ... is that also true?

 

But what about drug resistance? Won't the person eventually run out of medications to try?

 

And won't the immune system get weaker as you grow older?

 

What about the long term effects of anti-retroviral medicines ... any long-term toxicity?

 

How many of you here have taken the medicines for more than twenty or thirty years?

 

How fast does drug resistance occur?

 

Anybody can share?

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