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Discreet - Bi - Married Men Coffee Club

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On 01/01/2018 at 8:45 AM, Married Guy said:

Hi Guys....let us meet for a cup of coffee or tea and share our stories and experiences. This is a Non sexual activity, more of a support group. No age, race or body shape discriminationNo date and location yet. 

Thanks for sharing a cup of coffee with me. Your wisdom added value in my life. And thanks for making me laugh, i really needed that. I really think youre cute and charming. Too bad youre not looking for a buddy, thanks for your honesty. Maybe in another place and time.  

Edited by Married4Married

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On ‎5‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 5:22 PM, RolexSubmariner said:

Beer and wine will be much better than coffee :clap:  is nice to know you are organising one for this category. 

so typical of married men, from your name to your choice

 

 

Pubic,

they will not accept non-married

Edited by lovehandle

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2 hours ago, Pubic01 said:

Aiya lovahandle .. y u like that :(

hee hee, ask for their sympathy then

they might break a rule for a cutie on a condition: sit on their lapse when helping to pour drinks (not coffee or tea)

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Nice to know such grp exist... any merpup materialized yet? 

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14 hours ago, Married Guy said:

Come, lets set a date and time.  

Let keep the group small maybe 4-5 so that we could still talk to each other.  

Would love to have coffee but one on one only.  

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On 01/01/2018 at 8:45 AM, Married Guy said:

Hi Guys....let us meet for a cup of coffee or tea and share our stories and experiences. This is a Non sexual activity, more of a support group. No age, race or body shape discriminationNo date and location yet. 

I really really hope to see you again. Thanks for the coffee and for chatting with me.  Hoping to hold your hands in public one day. 

Edited by SuckUSuckMe

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I imagine the agenda would be: 

 

  • How to keep secrets from your wife and family
  • Ways to maintain an affair
  • How to sexually satisfy your wife and lover at the same time
  • 101 lies you can tell your wife to keep her from being suspicious
  • How to approach the wife to participate in a 3-way with your lover
  • 101 ways to deny that you enjoy sucking dick

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30 minutes ago, doncoin said:

I imagine the agenda would be: 

 

  • How to keep secrets from your wife and family
  • Ways to maintain an affair
  • How to sexually satisfy your wife and lover at the same time
  • 101 lies you can tell your wife to keep her from being suspicious
  • How to approach the wife to participate in a 3-way with your lover
  • 101 ways to deny that you enjoy sucking dick

Lol. Agenda not bad eh

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7 hours ago, doncoin said:

I imagine the agenda would be: 

 

  • How to keep secrets from your wife and family
  • Ways to maintain an affair
  • How to sexually satisfy your wife and lover at the same time
  • 101 lies you can tell your wife to keep her from being suspicious
  • How to approach the wife to participate in a 3-way with your lover
  • 101 ways to deny that you enjoy sucking dick

Good agenda for start

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15 hours ago, doncoin said:

I imagine the agenda would be: 

 

  • How to keep secrets from your wife and family
  • Ways to maintain an affair
  • How to sexually satisfy your wife and lover at the same time
  • 101 lies you can tell your wife to keep her from being suspicious
  • How to approach the wife to participate in a 3-way with your lover
  • 101 ways to deny that you enjoy sucking dick

@doncoin good one.

 

Whilst I don't view married men positively, I am sure they have reasons for what they are doing. After all, YOLO

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6 hours ago, Boydsg said:

@doncoin good one.

 

Whilst I don't view married men positively, I am sure they have reasons for what they are doing. After all, YOLO

 

i agree, however, I think it is a choice that they've made, and given the circumstances it is not an easy one. I do sympathise them, and the secrets and lies they have to keep and construct from their significant other, which makes the term "significant other" ironic, not to mention their families and loved ones. There is also the reality of living with the fear of getting caught or being outed. Even if they meet someone whom they really like, they cannot fall in love. That is not an option since they are already married, and the person they fell in love with is a man. As such, there is wall there that more or less limits the relationship to a physical one. It is a complex situation, and short of coming out, the other option is to keep it on the down low with hopes of never getting caught. 

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Well it a simple and easy. Can keep personal fellings, politic and whatever biting issue to yourself . Just be nice be yourself no need to create drama and give due respect on people belief and also space for anyone who want to be 

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On ‎1‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 11:51 PM, SuckUSuckMe said:

I really really hope to see you again. Thanks for the coffee and for chatting with me.  Hoping to hold your hands in public one day. 

wow! oredy meet up! must be nice encounter

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No beer cos we going for cost effective . Dont want to be seen like old folk sitting bloody sleezy with the ugly  china woman serving.

PREFER COFFEE NO HEART PAIN AND MENTAL TORTURE AFTER DRINKING.

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On ‎29‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 2:40 AM, Married Guy said:

Trust me it was "NOT" a nice encounter heheheh

isn't it in a small group?

 

I guess all of u didn't set expectations hence larger disapptmt

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11 hours ago, -Ignored- said:

isn't it in a small group?

 

I guess all of u didn't set expectations hence larger disapptmt

Actually it was a 1 to 1 meeting only. The actual meeting was ok.  It was after that is not so ok.  He went to a chat group and started saying things...  that is not cool.  Just have to be more careful.  So many crazy people over the net.  

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24 minutes ago, Married Guy said:

Actually it was a 1 to 1 meeting only. The actual meeting was ok.  It was after that is not so ok.  He went to a chat group and started saying things...  that is not cool.  Just have to be more careful.  So many crazy people over the net.  

So sorry to hear that

that s also why y i dislike chat grps

 

grps r formed for a professnl sharing eg proj based or eg on a common topic

cny goodies or gathering date to b set

 

not for anyone to share his pers view abt another human esp on his negativity

unless he aims to caution all that this person is a cheater or mB etc

if not, there s no reason to announce anything personal abt the person

 

i believe if u have anythng abt a person’s characteristics, (or things to clarify)u may wanna spk to him in private

leave the mass comm (or u need ur grp to judge/dcide)only at the chat grp or soc platform 

 

 

but at least for your case, after the meetup, u get to see the real him!!& the sessn itself was a good experience

 

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Mly married 52 178 73 can add me, but I’m a little quiet. I mean I don’t talk much..

line id:  isisis15 

Edited by Whitehair

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