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Zhang Ziyi commences legal action over sex scandal allegations

Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi denied yesterday media reports that she had allegedly “interacted” with Bo Xilai, the former Communist Party boss of China's Chongqing City in exchange for “huge” monetary gifts.

Zhang, who is currently shooting a new film in southern China, said on her personal microblog that many people “can take wind as rain” using their imaginations.

Her statement was taken as a denial of the media allegations about the sex scandal.

U.S.-based Chinese-language news website Boxun, the Apple Daily published in Hong Kong and Taiwan, and other Chinese-language media reported that the 32-year-old actress slept with Bo at least 10 times between 2007 and 2011.

Zhang was allegedly under investigation by the Chinese government for being paid to have sex with Bo, who was removed from his powerful political position after coming under investigation after the incident involving Wang Lijung, a former Chongqing vice mayor. Wang allegedly “defected” to the U.S. Consulate in Chengdu City, of Sichuan province, in February.

The media reports said that Zhang and Bo were first introduced by Bo's associate, Xu Ming, 41, who is the founder and chairman of Dalian Shide Group when Bo was party boss in Dalian City.

Unconfirmed reports said that Xu confessed to paying Zhang 6 million Chinese yuan in 2007 to personally have sex with her for the first time.

Xu later negotiated a deal for Bo to have sex with Zhang for 10 million yuan.

The Chinese media reports estimated that Zhang's sexual transactions with various rich and powerful figures have netted her 700 million yuan over the last 10 years, including 180 million yuan in cash from Xu alone.

Her wealth accumulated from prostituting herself was not taxed mainly due to intervention from Xu and some senior Chinese government officials, said the reports.

In 2009, Zhang was accused of cheating a married businessman of a huge sum of money, with whom she was alleged to be sexually involved with, while still engaged to an Israeli billionaire.

The Chinese media also reported in April that wealthy businessman Xu introduced more than 100 women to Bo for sex and that the women included household-name celebrities.

Zhang Ziyi's workshop has released a statement and engaged Hong Kong law firm Haldanes to issue a letter of demand to Apple Daily.

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Zhang Ziyi vows to seek justice over false reports "whatever the cost may be"

HAIKOU, China: Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi has for the first time, directly addressed a media report in a Hong Kong tabloid which claimed she had slept with powerful Chinese officials for money, and was under a travel ban as she is being investigated for her alleged links to disgraced former top Chinese official Bo Xilai.

"I'd like to thank everyone for their concern. I really want to tell everyone my attitude about this.

"This 'news' is a complete lie. Both within the article and between the lines, there were contemptuous lies," said Zhang during a press conference after the 12th Chinese Film Media Awards in Haikou on Wednesday, reported Chinese media.

"I met with my lawyers in Hong Kong and clearly expressed my position."

"Whatever the cost, I will seek legal recourse and pursue this matter to the very end," said Zhang, referring to an article in a Hong Kong tabloid that has triggered a wave of rumours about her.

Zhang explained that she seldom went out of her way to explain or respond to rumours and fabricated news, but decided to take the Hong Kong tabloid to task for the article as it, and other similar media reports, gave people a bad impression of the Chinese film industry.

"I read a lot of comments from people who don't know the truth and they think this film industry is like that (rife with unsavoury dealings).

"This time, these (irresponsible reports) have not only hurt me, but maligned the film industry. And worse of all, they (some media outlets) made use of such hot topics to fool the public," said the 32-year-old actress.

"The Grandmasters" caused absence

During the press conference, Zhang also revealed why she was absent from the world premiere of her new film "Dangerous Liaisons" at the Cannes Film Festival recently.

"I believe film festivals are the most direct, most global platforms to promote a film. I feel if you have a film, its best to show the film and promote it at a film festival.

"I didn't go because I was re-shooting some scenes for 'The Grandmasters' in Guangzhou ... Wong Kar Wai (the director of "The Grandmasters") wouldn't give me time off to go."

"Also, because I didn't watch the final cut of the film ("Dangerous Liaisons") before, I was feeling a little uneasy about it (attending the premiere)," said Zhang, putting to rest speculation that it was her rumoured travel ban which forced her to give the premiere a miss.

While Zhang still did not know when Wong's "The Grandmasters", which has been in production since 2009, will be completed, she said work is already under way for her next film "Sophie's Revenge 2", which will go into production once she is done with Wong's martial arts epic.

"The week before last, my colleagues have already gone to check out locations in Macau, Singapore and Hong Kong," said Zhang of "Sophie's Revenge 2".

"After shooting 'The Grandmaster', we will be working on that."

-CNA/ha

http://www.channelne...1204679/1/.html

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Fan Bingbing the culprit?

(台湾讯)据《中国时报》报道,中国编剧兼知名影评人毕成功在微博上指,近日章子怡卷入的风波,其实是“另一位明星”的诬陷计计划,昨天被中国大陆媒体解读所谓的“明星”就是范冰冰,但毕成功和范冰冰对此则全力否认。

报道指,毕成功5月31日在微博上揭秘章子怡是被诬陷,他还被指称“幕后黑手”尽管频繁出席各大国际影展,拿到多个大牌代言,但久无作品问世,因为她在圈中已臭名远扬。

网帖一出,不少网友感叹当前娱乐圈尔虞我诈,还称毕成功微博中所指女星就是范冰冰,更指网帖指此次事件背后,是有圈内明星的团队针对章子怡进行诬陷,计划早在今年3月已开始酝酿,只等章子怡新片上映前一个月左右进行扩散。

但毕成功否认此事,并表示“本人微博从不指名道姓”,且称自己爆料并无具体指称,甚至直指网帖是在“挑拨离间”。

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Fan Bingbing files suit over sex scandal allegations

BEIJING: Chinese actress Fan Bingbing has taken legal action against renowned playwright-film critic Bi Chen Gong and a Chinese news site based in Guizhou, Guiyang, for "distorting the truth, libel and damaging of her personal reputation," reported Chinese media.

According to the lawyer's statement released through Fan's official website on Monday, the actress had decided to sue the individual and the site for their comments and reports which portrayed her as the mastermind behind Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi's alleged sex scandal.

The rumour started late last month.

Bi had posted on his micro blog about someone being behind Zhang Ziyi's reported scandal and had suggested Fan being the mastermind.

"Miss F, aren't you tired? Let the others off, they just happen to be better actresses than you," said a posting by Bi on May 29, which had since been deleted.

After the comments on Bi's microblog were posted, a reporter of the news site published a report named "Playwright reveals the inside story behind Zhang Ziyi's scandals, mastermind is Fan Bingbing?".

The story ended with a statement which said: "It wouldn't be surprising if Zhang Ziyi's scandals are created by Fan Bingbing."

Commenting on the issue, Bi said that he "did not mention any names (in his postings)" and "has got nothing to do with regard to subsequent media reports."

Fan's appointed lawyers from Beijing Dacheng Law Office stated: "Miss Fan Bingbing is determined to take legal action against the person and medium for defamation in order to protect her personal rights as a performer who should be respected and protected."

- CNA/lp

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Zhang Ziyi sues Apple Daily over false claims

http://timesofindia....ow/14056207.cms

Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi has sued Hong Kong's leading newspaper the Apple Daily and its sister weekly Next Magazine over reports that she prostituted herself with senior Chinese officials.

The Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon star signed the suit presented to the Hong Kong High Court on Monday, saying the reports were "seriously defamatory" and "false".

An article in Apple Daily on May 29 said Zhang "is a prostitute" and had sex with disgraced top official Bo Xilai and his wealthy associate Xu Ming for money on "numerous occasions", the court document said.

The tabloid also alleged the 33-year-old actress had sex with other top officials and "unnamed rich persons", and had accrued a fortune worth 700 million yuan ($110 million) from these illicit liaisons over 10 years.

"The plaintiff has been subjected to public odium, hatred, contempt or ridicule," the suit signed by the actress said, adding it would seek unspecified damages.

"The plaintiff's public image has also been seriously and continuously undermined which has caused and will continue to cause loss and damage to her profession and career."

Apple Daily, a Chinese-language newspaper known for racy celebrity gossip and strong criticism of the Chinese communist authorities, did not reply to requests from AFP for comment on the suit.

The story was removed from the newspaper's website after Zhang threatened to sue last month.

Bo was sacked from his post as boss of Chongqing city in March and then suspended from China's powerful central politburo for "serious discipline violation" -- code for corruption. He has not been seen since.

His wife, Gu Kailai, is in custody under suspicion of ordering the murder of a British businessman.

Zhang also denied Apple Daily's assertion that she was now under investigation by Chinese authorities and was barred from leaving China.

Apple Daily and Next Magazine are both owned by Hong Kong entrepreneur Jimmy Lai's Next Media. Apple Daily editor-in-chief Cheung Kim-hung and Next Magazine's chief editor Li Chi-ho were also named as defendants in the suit.

A spokesman for the actress, whose other films include Memoirs of a Geisha and Rush Hour 2, said in a post on Chinese social media that Zhang "will not tolerate the recent irresponsible media rumours".

"The legal proceedings mean that we have started down the road to maintaining her legal rights and interests. Justice can be expected soon," the spokesman said.

Zhang did not attend the premiere in Cannes last month of her latest film, Dangerous Liaisons, a Chinese-language version of the timeless French tale of sex and betrayal set in 1930s Shanghai.

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Chinese Not Surprised By Zhang Ziyi Scandal

The Zhang Ziyi scandal may be unfounded, but trading sex for favors is part of the new China. Paul Mooney reports from Beijing.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/06/09/chinese-not-surprised-by-zhang-ziyi-scandal.html

When the rumor broke that Chinese film star Zhang Ziyi had been paid for sex with disgraced Communist Party strongman Bo Xilai, the story grabbed headlines around the world. But in China, where many believe that liaisons like this are just part of doing business, few eyebrows were raised by the allegations.

An angry Zhang, 33, was quick to deny the rumors that she’d had sex more than 10 times with Bo between 2007 and 2011 for $1 million each time. Industry sources have also expressed doubts about the news, saying that the wealthy actress, who has starred in a number of Chinese and foreign blockbusters, including Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Rush Hour, and Memoirs of a Geisha, would have little need to trade her body for cash.

Her latest movie, interestingly named Dangerous Liaisons, had its world preview at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival, but Zhang failed to appear, leading to speculation that she is under investigation in the Bo case and so couldn’t leave China. Zhang explained to the media that she was busy working on her next film and thus could not attend the event.

It’s very possible that Zhang has become the latest victim in the Communist Party’s smear campaign aimed at thoroughly destroying Bo. The once powerful princeling, who is under investigation for violating party discipline, was dismissed as party chief of Chongqing in March and dropped from the Politburo a month later. His wife, Gu Kailai, is reportedly suspected to be responsible for the murder of a British businessman in November. In recent months, a steady stream of scandals surrounding the Bo family has been leaked to the Western media—most likely by his political opponents.

Film-industry sources say that the Chinese actress has offended a number of people, anyone of whom could have been the source for the unsubstantiated rumors.

Still, many Chinese say they believed the story of sexual liaisons. Right or wrong, there’s a widely held perception in China that many beautiful actresses, singers, and dancers sleep their way to success.

Ada Shen, an American who has worked as a film producer for years in China, said that she’s seen little evidence that Chinese actresses regularly trade sex for favors. “The idea that you can sleep your way to the top is not well founded,” says Shen. ‘I can’t say it’s not a problem, but I also can’t say it’s institutionalized.”

Yet insiders say the problem of trading sex for favors may be more prominent among young star wannabes, who’ve not made it in the industry yet. It’s no secret that expensive cars pile up outside the gates of the Beijing Film Academy, the Central Academy of Drama, and other prestigious arts schools around the city, waiting to pick up students as they leave campus.

The editor of the Chinese edition of a leading American fashion magazine says girls at performing-arts schools openly talk about their gandie, or “godfathers,” who fund their expensive lifestyles and who hopefully will be able to give their nascent careers a nudge.

“People who want to get into the Beijing Film Academy need guanxi [connections],” says Yu Qi, a book editor in Beijing. “And once you get in, you need money.”

“To become famous you need expensive clothes, name-brand bags, to be seen in expensive places, and you need directors to give you roles,” she says. “They have a great number of needs.”

The magazine editor says the skyrocketing property market in leading cities is another factor pushing the liaison between beautiful young women and powerful men. She says a decade ago she was able to purchase an apartment on her modest salary as a young journalist. No more. “Housing prices have shot up and many people have had their dreams shattered,” she said. “A girl today could work her entire life and never be able to afford an apartment.”

“But if you have a godfather, he may give you a car and a house, something that otherwise could take a lifetime to obtain,” she says.

Meanwhile high-level officials and wealthy businessmen see beautiful young women as status symbols to be conquered. “I’ve got a Mercedes and now I have a beautiful girl sitting in it,” says the editor, mimicking a powerful man.

Yu says further that wealthy businessmen can be quite persistent. “I have money and I like you,” they say. “I’ll pelt you with my money until you come with me.” She says the girls are showered in money and gifts and are taken to good restaurants and interesting places. “How long can they resist this?” she asks. Yu tells of a wealthy Chinese businessman who apparently invested in a TV drama just so he could get close to the actresses.

Observers say the trend is a sign of the moral decay in China that is a byproduct of the country’s breakneck economic growth. “The whole society is like this,” says the editor. “We don’t have any values. Our parents believed in communism and Marx, but we don’t believe in anything. There are no beliefs and nothing is revered.”

“Girls feel, ‘I’m young and beautiful, why can’t I have a great life?’” she continues.

The situation can be summed up in a popular Chinese expression that says “Men turn bad once they get rich, while women get rich only after they turn bad.”

“There’s no shame at all, none at all,” says Yu. “And everyone accepts this.”

According to the Chinese media, an online poll conducted by China Youth Daily found that nearly 60 percent of respondents had peers who hoped to marry rich, or to rely on wealthy and powerful men as a means to realize their personal goals. Perhaps in response to this kind of attitude, several prominent universities have drafted new regulations that prohibit female students from becoming mistresses—the punishment is being expelled from school.

Writer Zhang Lijia, the author of Socialism is Great! A Worker’s Memoir of The New China, says that young women have grown up in an increasingly commercial society, and that they’re “more calculating, materialistic and with a greater sexual license.”

“They don’t carry the same sense of shame,” says Zhang, who is currently at work on a novel about prostitutes. “They’ll do anything. If they can sell their body, why not? They’ll do whatever is necessary to get ahead.”

“Sex is not a big deal anymore,” she says. “If you can have sex for gain, why not?”

She contrasts this with her own generation, which grew up during the Cultural Revolution, which had a far more conservative upbringing. “For our generation, sex was something you only did after you got married,” she says, “and not something you took advantage of.”

“There’s no bottom line anymore,” says the editor. “Business people put poison in our food. And so girls just think if they’re just hanging out with a sugar daddy, what’s the difference? It doesn’t hurt anyone.”

Yu says that since reform and opening up, everything in China has been “measured in terms of money.”

“Young people feel the only value is money,” says Yu. “Their parents keep telling them money is important, and if you want to live well or go places, you need money.” She says beautiful girls are more likely to get “resources”, and that when someone goes back home wearing expensive clothes and other luxury items, “everyone envies you.”

“People will laugh at you if you’re poor, but they won’t laugh at you if you’re a prostitute,” she says, quoting a traditional Chinese saying that has greater resonance today.

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Chinese Not Surprised By Zhang Ziyi Scandal

The Zhang Ziyi scandal may be unfounded, but trading sex for favors is part of the new China. Paul Mooney reports from Beijing.

http://www.thedailyb...yi-scandal.html

When the rumor broke that Chinese film star Zhang Ziyi had been paid for sex with disgraced Communist Party strongman Bo Xilai, the story grabbed headlines around the world. But in China, where many believe that liaisons like this are just part of doing business, few eyebrows were raised by the allegations.

An angry Zhang, 33, was quick to deny the rumors that she’d had sex more than 10 times with Bo between 2007 and 2011 for $1 million each time. Industry sources have also expressed doubts about the news, saying that the wealthy actress, who has starred in a number of Chinese and foreign blockbusters, including Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Rush Hour, and Memoirs of a Geisha, would have little need to trade her body for cash.

Her latest movie, interestingly named Dangerous Liaisons, had its world preview at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival, but Zhang failed to appear, leading to speculation that she is under investigation in the Bo case and so couldn’t leave China. Zhang explained to the media that she was busy working on her next film and thus could not attend the event.

It’s very possible that Zhang has become the latest victim in the Communist Party’s smear campaign aimed at thoroughly destroying Bo. The once powerful princeling, who is under investigation for violating party discipline, was dismissed as party chief of Chongqing in March and dropped from the Politburo a month later. His wife, Gu Kailai, is reportedly suspected to be responsible for the murder of a British businessman in November. In recent months, a steady stream of scandals surrounding the Bo family has been leaked to the Western media—most likely by his political opponents.

Film-industry sources say that the Chinese actress has offended a number of people, anyone of whom could have been the source for the unsubstantiated rumors.

Still, many Chinese say they believed the story of sexual liaisons. Right or wrong, there’s a widely held perception in China that many beautiful actresses, singers, and dancers sleep their way to success.

Ada Shen, an American who has worked as a film producer for years in China, said that she’s seen little evidence that Chinese actresses regularly trade sex for favors. “The idea that you can sleep your way to the top is not well founded,” says Shen. ‘I can’t say it’s not a problem, but I also can’t say it’s institutionalized.”

Yet insiders say the problem of trading sex for favors may be more prominent among young star wannabes, who’ve not made it in the industry yet. It’s no secret that expensive cars pile up outside the gates of the Beijing Film Academy, the Central Academy of Drama, and other prestigious arts schools around the city, waiting to pick up students as they leave campus.

The editor of the Chinese edition of a leading American fashion magazine says girls at performing-arts schools openly talk about their gandie, or “godfathers,” who fund their expensive lifestyles and who hopefully will be able to give their nascent careers a nudge.

“People who want to get into the Beijing Film Academy need guanxi [connections],” says Yu Qi, a book editor in Beijing. “And once you get in, you need money.”

“To become famous you need expensive clothes, name-brand bags, to be seen in expensive places, and you need directors to give you roles,” she says. “They have a great number of needs.”

The magazine editor says the skyrocketing property market in leading cities is another factor pushing the liaison between beautiful young women and powerful men. She says a decade ago she was able to purchase an apartment on her modest salary as a young journalist. No more. “Housing prices have shot up and many people have had their dreams shattered,” she said. “A girl today could work her entire life and never be able to afford an apartment.”

“But if you have a godfather, he may give you a car and a house, something that otherwise could take a lifetime to obtain,” she says.

Meanwhile high-level officials and wealthy businessmen see beautiful young women as status symbols to be conquered. “I’ve got a Mercedes and now I have a beautiful girl sitting in it,” says the editor, mimicking a powerful man.

Yu says further that wealthy businessmen can be quite persistent. “I have money and I like you,” they say. “I’ll pelt you with my money until you come with me.” She says the girls are showered in money and gifts and are taken to good restaurants and interesting places. “How long can they resist this?” she asks. Yu tells of a wealthy Chinese businessman who apparently invested in a TV drama just so he could get close to the actresses.

Observers say the trend is a sign of the moral decay in China that is a byproduct of the country’s breakneck economic growth. “The whole society is like this,” says the editor. “We don’t have any values. Our parents believed in communism and Marx, but we don’t believe in anything. There are no beliefs and nothing is revered.”

“Girls feel, ‘I’m young and beautiful, why can’t I have a great life?’” she continues.

The situation can be summed up in a popular Chinese expression that says “Men turn bad once they get rich, while women get rich only after they turn bad.”

“There’s no shame at all, none at all,” says Yu. “And everyone accepts this.”

According to the Chinese media, an online poll conducted by China Youth Daily found that nearly 60 percent of respondents had peers who hoped to marry rich, or to rely on wealthy and powerful men as a means to realize their personal goals. Perhaps in response to this kind of attitude, several prominent universities have drafted new regulations that prohibit female students from becoming mistresses—the punishment is being expelled from school.

Writer Zhang Lijia, the author of Socialism is Great! A Worker’s Memoir of The New China, says that young women have grown up in an increasingly commercial society, and that they’re “more calculating, materialistic and with a greater sexual license.”

“They don’t carry the same sense of shame,” says Zhang, who is currently at work on a novel about prostitutes. “They’ll do anything. If they can sell their body, why not? They’ll do whatever is necessary to get ahead.”

“Sex is not a big deal anymore,” she says. “If you can have sex for gain, why not?”

She contrasts this with her own generation, which grew up during the Cultural Revolution, which had a far more conservative upbringing. “For our generation, sex was something you only did after you got married,” she says, “and not something you took advantage of.”

“There’s no bottom line anymore,” says the editor. “Business people put poison in our food. And so girls just think if they’re just hanging out with a sugar daddy, what’s the difference? It doesn’t hurt anyone.”

Yu says that since reform and opening up, everything in China has been “measured in terms of money.”

“Young people feel the only value is money,” says Yu. “Their parents keep telling them money is important, and if you want to live well or go places, you need money.” She says beautiful girls are more likely to get “resources”, and that when someone goes back home wearing expensive clothes and other luxury items, “everyone envies you.”

“People will laugh at you if you’re poor, but they won’t laugh at you if you’re a prostitute,” she says, quoting a traditional Chinese saying that has greater resonance today.

true, people will despise you if you are a poor ugly beggar

will flock and lust for you if you are a pretty and successful prostitute

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  • 6 months later...

I wen to movies and watch Big Shanghai and I saw 黄晓明 hairy chest! On My God! For me it is Goodbye and good luck to Jason Stratham and Hello to 黄晓明!!!!!!!!!

Please share pixs of 黄晓明 without shirt.

I have never to watch 黄晓明's return of the condo heroes, oh god, what have I missed?

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It is very interesting to see how Sporeans behave, some years back, when China and their movie productions were not as hyped as today, we kept seeing in the forum how Sporeans condemn Chinese being country bumpkins, smell, don't look nice, etc etc. It was as though Sporeans are God's gift to mankind.

Now, we see more Sporeans lusting after Chinese (read PRC as how Sporeans term them derogatively). There are also some who lust after Chinese contruction and blue collar workers somewhere in this forum. Interesting to see how Sporeans are being humbled in terms in gay world ( and more in reality sooner or later).

Back to the gay world, I understand that the many PRCs laugh at Sporeans for being ugly, do not have good features and height as compared to their own country folks.

Good to see how roles are being reversed now.

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It is very interesting to see how Sporeans behave, some years back, when China and their movie productions were not as hyped as today, we kept seeing in the forum how Sporeans condemn Chinese being country bumpkins, smell, don't look nice, etc etc. It was as though Sporeans are God's gift to mankind.

Now, we see more Sporeans lusting after Chinese (read PRC as how Sporeans term them derogatively). There are also some who lust after Chinese contruction and blue collar workers somewhere in this forum. Interesting to see how Sporeans are being humbled in terms in gay world ( and more in reality sooner or later).

Back to the gay world, I understand that the many PRCs laugh at Sporeans for being ugly, do not have good features and height as compared to their own country folks.

Good to see how roles are being reversed now.

I would point out that those with blue worker fetishes may not necessarily think that the workers are better then them. Some like to assert their dominance over them, which in a way, still implies they are of a lower class.

Anyway, back to thy regular programming.

 

 

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I would point out that those with blue worker fetishes may not necessarily think that the workers are better then them. Some like to assert their dominance over them, which in a way, still implies they are of a lower class.

Well said EasleyLim!! :clap: :thumb:

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Guest chinawine

And china mainlanders are the ugly ones on the inside... oh slip of the tongue... purleaaase n where does all these namecalling and racist remarks lead us to. I dont laugh at your poverty so neither shd u laugh at our * slutty * yo..

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huang xiao ming has gone through alot of plastic surgery procedures before (on his face). maybe the bod is done by aesthetic surgery or procedure as well.

he is nice to look at, but is quite proud and unfriendly. ;)

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huang xiao ming has gone through alot of plastic surgery procedures before (on his face). maybe the bod is done by aesthetic surgery or procedure as well.

he is nice to look at, but is quite proud and unfriendly. ;)

At least he is nice to look, but proud & unfriendly; many Singaporeans are ugly, but still proud and unfriendly. LOL.

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huang xiao ming has gone through alot of plastic surgery procedures before (on his face). maybe the bod is done by aesthetic surgery or procedure as well.

he is nice to look at, but is quite proud and unfriendly. ;)

Not surprise tht he went thru lots of plastic surgery, since i noticed tht he looks more and more yandao. He looks so much different from last time!

对自己好是一种幸福,

对别人好是一种积福。

 

Spend time counting your blessings,

not airing your complaints.

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Plastic Surgery! I should have known better! we cant even trust their milk powder, let alone "good looking'" actors! what a crap! Jason Statham! Take me back! Boo Hoo Hoo! got cheated by the chinese fellows again! When will I ever learn!

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At least he is nice to look, but proud & unfriendly; many Singaporeans are ugly, but still proud and unfriendly. LOL.

He is nice to look at simply because he has money to make some changes, so no big deal...........with money, maybe an ugly creature like you can look human finally............

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It is very interesting to see how Sporeans behave, some years back, when China and their movie productions were not as hyped as today, we kept seeing in the forum how Sporeans condemn Chinese being country bumpkins, smell, don't look nice, etc etc. It was as though Sporeans are God's gift to mankind.

...............

Back to the gay world, I understand that the many PRCs laugh at Sporeans for being ugly, do not have good features and height as compared to their own country folks.

Good to see how roles are being reversed now.

Don't have to date years back...............they are still the same..........or rather...........YOU are still the same?

No one said Sporeans are God's gift except you but we will accept your praise, let us buy you a drink, you are the mother of whores?

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SIGH. It starts from a simple expression of adoration for one actor and escalates to misplaced "patriotism" of entire countries. Quarrelsome bitches.

If he wants to start demeaning Singaporeans, let I will shut his mouth with a piece of his own medicine. Simple. The only plastic surgery he ever needs is to sew up his mouth with China silk.

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http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/entertainment/view/1247300/1/.html

BEIJING: Chinese authorities handed warnings to several celebrities who voiced support for a newspaper at the centre of a censorship battle online, newspaper reports and social media posts said on Friday.

Taiwanese singer Annie Yi, who works in mainland China, said on her social media account that she had been invited to "drink tea" with authorities, a common euphemism for being cautioned by authorities, the South China Morning Post reported.

The warning came after Yi -- who has more than six million followers on Sina Weibo, a Chinese website similar to Twitter -- expressed support for Southern Weekly, a newspaper at the centre of protests over government censorship this week.

Other Chinese celebrities, including the former head of Google China, Kai-Fu Lee, and property tycoon Ren Zhiqiang also said they received invitations to "drink tea", after posting messages in support of the paper, according to online posts.

The two men have a combined 38 million followers on the site, which had more than 400 million registered users in 2012.

Chinese activists have previously said that invitations to "drink tea" are extended by state security police, who use such meetings as warnings not to engage in anti-government activities.

Several Chinese celebrities posted messages in support of the Southern Weekly this week, after journalists at the paper protested government censors' replacement of a pro-reform editorial.

Yao Chen, an actress who has 32 million followers on her Weibo account, earlier posted the paper's logo and quoted Russian dissident Alexandr Solzhenitsyn: "One word of truth shall outweigh the whole world".

Southern Weekly was published as scheduled on Thursday, after reports that newspaper staff had struck a deal with authorities that the paper would not be censored before publication.

- AFP/al

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Guest Queen's English

Why do you take it so personally?

BTW, it's a "taste" of his own medicine. Medicine comes in pills and bottles, not in pieces.

And I don't think people regard sewing up of one's mouth as plastic surgery. You really have a strange view on aesthetics.

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Chinese actors say ni hao to Hollywood

2012-10-17 10:11:04 Global Times

For decades, Hollywood movies have favored Western stars like Bruce Willis, Johnny Depp and Julia Roberts. Only a few Chinese actors, old names like Jackie Chan, Jet Li, Chow Yun-fat and Gong Li, have made it big in Hollywood, and most roles for these stars have been limited to martial arts films.

Yet recently, in a slew of new Hollywood blockbusters, such as Looper, Cloud Atlas and Resident Evil: Retribution, a group of new Chinese faces have emerged on the big screen in the US, and they are likely to blaze a new trail for Chinese actors. Despite this move, it's still unclear whether these new faces in Hollywood will become superstars like their predecessors.

Future looks bright

In the past few months and the months to come, five major Hollywood films, The Expendables 2, Looper, Cloud Atlas, Resident Evil: Retribution and Iron Man 3, have been or will be released in the Chinese mainland, putting some familiar Chinese faces on the screen.

While these lucky Chinese movie stars, Yu Nan, Xu Qing, Zhou Xun, Li Bingbing and Wang Xueqi, are well known in China, they are fresh faces to most Western audiences. They are also given prominent roles in the blockbusters, signaling a shift away from casting Chinese to appear with one or two lines before leaving the screen for the rest of the film.

Actor Wang Xueqi is a typical example. Wang, 56, is a familiar face in many domestic movies and TV dramas, such as Bodyguards and Assassins (2009), Sacrifice (2010) and Caught in the Web (2012), but seldom stars in overseas works.

In the upcoming Iron Man 3, he will appear on screen as Chinese scientist Chen Lu, who turns into supervillain Radioactive Man, playing opposite Robert John Downey Jr as Iron Man.

Actress Li Bingbing landed a leading role as Ada Wong in Resident Evil, and her costume will include a specially designed red qipao, a traditional Chinese dress, and a wig.

In addition, Chinese actors are finally likely to break the set image of kung fu fighters, which for a long time dominated almost all Chinese roles in Western movies.

Zhou Xun plays two roles in fantasy movie Cloud Atlas, with one appear with curly blonde hair and blue eyes, atypical for a Chinese actress in Hollywood.

A bigger appetite

To some degree, this phenomenon of Chinese actors now being able to get more important roles in bigger films is due to Chinese stars' showbiz savvy.

According to a report from Southern Metropolis Entertainment Weekly, though at the moment Chinese stars still have limited choices, they prefer to choose branded Hollywood works like The Expendables and Iron Man, which sees them competing for many of the same roles.

Southern Metropolis Entertainment Weekly said before Yu Nan and Li Bingbing were chosen, casting crews of The Expendables 2 and Resident Evil met with a number of top Chinese mainland actresses. After Iron Man 3 was rumored to have certain Chinese characters, there were reports of several Chinese movie stars, such as Fan Bingbing, Chen Kun, Andy Lau, getting consideration for the cast.

As insiders told Southern Metropolis Entertainment Weekly, popular mainland actors like Huang Xiaoming and Feng Shaofeng also met with Iron Man 3 producers. Though they may be cast in minor roles, a film credit alongside Downey Jr is still attractive to these stars.

Even more enticing than billing with a star is the chance to work on well-established movie brands. An anonymous insider who handles publicity for a top mainland actress told Southern Metropolis Entertainment Weekly that working on a famous Hollywood movie is very helpful in building one's name, especially when the film comes to domestic theaters.

"Since Li Bingbing stars in Resident Evil, most of the promotions in Hong Kong and Taiwan are about her," said the anonymous source. "Even her refusal to attend the premier in Japan made news."

Show me the money

While it's clear that Chinese actors benefit from appearing in Hollywood movies, US film producers are seeking them out for a very good reason.

"Hollywood cares a lot about the market," Li Zhong, a movie critic, told the Global Times. "Recent years have seen huge domestic box office sales and an increase in the number of cinemas in China, which brought more revenue to Hollywood."

"[it is useful to cast local talent] to attract domestic audiences and make the movies' names known to a bigger crowd," he continued, adding that even though more new faces are entering Hollywood today, this is not necessarily because of their acting skills.

On the marketing side, a veteran insider who likes to be referred as "Y" agreed that this relationship is mutually beneficial.

"When Hollywood chooses an actor, it will consider whether the star is popular at the moment and has a place in market, while the star is interested in films that will be released around the world and whether they can be featured prominently in promotions in Asia," the veteran insider told Southern Metropolis Entertainment Weekly.

Li further noted that Hollywood filmmakers may also care about which talent agencies will be negotiating the actor's contract and running local publicity, as some companies are better versed than others in how to promote a movie in China.

Yet, even though domestic movie stars are eyeing the global stage, many put their projects in China first.

Ji Xiang, actress Li Bingbing's agent, confirmed to Southern Metropolis Entertainment Weekly that producers of The Expendables 2 had also thought about Li in the beginning and hoped she could travel to Romania for a month-long training. But because she was shooting I Do, a domestic romantic movie, at the time, she refused the offer.

"But it depends on the importance of the Hollywood movie, as well," Li countered. "A leading role in a bad domestic film is less attractive than a minor supporting role in a Hollywood blockbuster."

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'Crouching Tiger' Actress Demands Journalist Reveal Sources Behind Prostitution Story

10:33 AM PST 1/22/2013 by Eriq Gardner

However, the lawyers fighting Zhang Ziyi's defamation lawsuit as an impingement of free speech, object to the unmasking of "politically vulnerable" Chinese sources.

zhang_ziyi.jpg

Francois Durand/Getty Images

On Friday, a California federal court will play host to an important hearing in actress Zhang Ziyi's defamation lawsuit against U.S.-based China Free Press and a journalist over published claims that she is a prostitute who has earned more than $100 million for having sexual relations with high-ranking Chinese officials.

The battle has enormous stakes.

Zhang, who has starred in such films as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Hero and Rush Hour 2, is looking to force Weican Null Meng, who writes for the Chinese dissident news website Boxun, to give up the sources that led to his prostitution reports. Zhang says the scandal has cost her quite a bit of income in the entertainment industry and ruined potential endorsement deals with luxury designer brand Michael Kors, French automaker Citroen and others.

But this is hardly the typical defamation case.

The defendants are gearing up for the Friday hearing that will determine whether and how the lawsuit proceeds. Lives will be on the line.

The stories originally gained attention not only due to the inclusion of a famous actress but also Bo Xilai, a former member of China's Communist government who was ousted from his post and entangled in a political scandal that forced his house arrest on charges of playing a role in the murder of a British businessman. The scandal drew international news attention, and Meng reported an untold aspect of the story -- that Bo and other high-level Communist Party officials in China had hired Zhang as a prostitute.

The stories were picked up by a plethora of news outlets including CNN, The Huffington Post and Yahoo.

Zhang's libel lawsuit that followed said the prostitution story was based on anonymous stories and not true at all and that when Boxun News was contacted about the falsity of the allegations, the publication refused to run a retraction.

Meng's attorney Marc Randazza then stood up to challenge the lawsuit as a "SLAPP," meaning an alleged use of the legal process to interfere with his client's First Amendment rights. In this instance, Randazza said the actress' legal move "seemed like a clever Chinese government plan to flush out the source, or, as a consolation prize, to shut down a journalistic gadfly."

In bringing an anti-SLAPP motion to strike the claims, Randazza also says the suit was filed "solely to create a Hobson's choice for its defendants: Either divulge their anonymous sources inside the People's Republic of China so that they may be subject to cruel, unusual and inhumane persecution, or surrender their own rights to free expression under the United States Constitution."

During the course of the litigation, Meng testified that there were three sources that formed the basis of his reports. "Source A" was someone Meng had relied upon extensively in the past who had learned the information from a Chinese businessman who was arrested as part of the corruption case against Bo. This primary source is described by the journalist as having a track record of reliability. "Source B" was an entertainment industry insider or a researcher in the social science area who had familiarity with the entertainment business. "Source C" was a freelance reporter Zhao Yan, who formerly worked for The New York Times and was arrested in China for leaking info about the Chinese leadership to foreign media.

Meng's attorneys has submitted a declaration from David Ardia, a media law professor at the University of North Carolina, who met with Meng about her sources, reviewed materials and documents in the case and conducted a post-publication libel assessment. His conclusion? "There is no basis to correct or retract the stories at issue in this case," he says in court documents.

Meanwhile, Zhang's attorneys at the Glaser Weil Fink law firm call the information provided by these sources to be "nothing more than rumors, innuendo and hearsay -- several if not many times removed."

Additionally, they have submitted their own declarations attacking the journalism practices of the defendants. For example, Hollywood attorney Larry Stein has submitted his own opinion in which he states it to be remarkable and against industry practice that Meng never attempted to verify his story with Zhang's representatives. He says that at a minimum, this demonstrates a reckless disregard for the truth.

He also says that "if reporters are permitted to write false statements and then hide behind anonymous sources known only to them allegedly out of concern about what might happen to such sources if they are disclosed, they can say whatever they want with impunity."

Friday's hearing will get into all sorts of legally tricky issues.

One is jurisdiction. Should a North Carolina-based journalist who has written about a Chinese actress receiving $100 million from Chinese officials in exchange for sexual services be forced to defend litigation in California?

Another has to do with whether Zhang needs to post a $200,000 bond for the case to continue. If Zhang loses on the anti-SLAPP motion, California law provides the defendant with the possibility of recovering legal fees. Meng's attorneys say they don't want a situation where Zhang, a Chinese citizen, can skip out on paying; Zhang's attorneys say the bond motion is moot because the concurrently heard motion to strike the lawsuit will settle this money issue.

And finally, the hearing will resolve how the case proceeds.

In reaction to Meng's anti-SLAPP motion, the actress' attorneys say that their lawsuit isn't meritless -- that she has a right to her reputation and business interests. The plaintiff says Meng has failed to meet the burden of showing the alleged defamatory statements concern an issue of public interest, arguing that supposed "sex deals" don't have much to do with a "major political scandal." The plaintiff say they have alleged sufficient evidence to prevail on their claims that the defendants acted with actual malice by avoiding the truth in regards to libelous statements. And Zhang's attorneys say that at a minimum, their client is entitled to know more about these confidential sources.

"The identities of Defendants' sources are necessary to test their veracity and reliability and to determine whether such sources even exist," Zhang's legal papers say.

E-mail: eriq.gardner@thr.com; Twitter: @eriqgardner

Links:

[1] http://www.hollywood...5#disqus_thread

[2] http://pinterest.com...'Crouching Tiger' Actress Demands Journalist Reveal Sources Behind Prostitution Story

[3] http://www.hollywood...ud-atlas-414219

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Guest Guest

那些年,范冰冰艳压或力压过的女星

Chinese actress Fan Bingbing is accused of dirty tricks to stomp all over her fellow rival actresses.
Victims include Zhang Ziyi, Li Bingbing, Gong Li, Maggie Cheung and even Hollywood actresses like Anne Hathaway.

http://bbs.67.com/thread-1119367-1-1.html

从好莱坞明星到国外超模,从内地顶级一线女星到初出茅庐的小花旦,范冰冰见一个压一个,见两个压一双,被范冰冰压过的女星加起来可以绕地球三圈。

前日,某网友发表名为《那些年,被范冰冰艳压或力压过的女星》,这位网友表示:“要说写起通稿,国内绝对没有人能比得上范冰冰工作室,无论出席何种活动,只要碰上范冰冰就只有被艳压的份。从好莱坞明星到国外超模,从内地顶级一线女星到初出茅庐的小花旦,范冰冰见一个压一个,见两个压一双,被范冰冰压过的女星加起来可以绕地球三圈。”这名网友把范冰冰参加时装周活动时各大网站的报道集合在一起,比如,“时装周范冰冰力压姚晨巩俐”“范冰冰红裙戴蝴蝶结,艳压李冰冰”“范冰冰风情万种力压章子怡”等等。有网友笑言:“范爷真够霸气”。也有不少网友指责范冰冰工作室的通稿写得有问题。

对此,范冰冰工作室进行回应:“谢谢各位媒体的支持。另外还请下笔起标题的大大们慎重啊,中文如此博大精深,别总‘力压’,‘艳压’拼点击流量了,‘油压’,‘指压’再来个刮痧拔罐那多舒坦。中箭真心好痛。”此外,范冰冰工作室副总经理杨思维也为“范爷”鸣不平,她说:“每次受到攻击,最心疼的就是各位粉丝,看到你们为冰冰难过,甚至愤怒地和别人吵架,提供各种资讯给我们,也有影迷也来质问,为什么我们不澄清,不声明。我想说的是,很多在我们眼中的大事在别人眼里都是一笑而过的趣闻,没有高调处理是因为范爷没放在心上,范爷放在心上的是你们,她知道你们要什么,她很努力。

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Guest Guest

no news and gossip, just sharing this matured china male newscaster 新闻男主播 called 邱启明. good looking and manly.

125aa0f09f3g214.jpg

1332809836797.jpg

Img341903562.jpg

Img347850597.jpg

d067e50e7d1911086f4603.jpg

anyone's type? :B)

Do you know how old is he? Curious.
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那些年,范冰冰艳压或力压过的女星

Chinese actress Fan Bingbing is accused of dirty tricks to stomp all over her fellow rival actresses.

Victims include Zhang Ziyi, Li Bingbing, Gong Li, Maggie Cheung and even Hollywood actresses like Anne Hathaway.

http://bbs.67.com/thread-1119367-1-1.html

从好莱坞明星到国外超模,从内地顶级一线女星到初出茅庐的小花旦,范冰冰见一个压一个,见两个压一双,被范冰冰压过的女星加起来可以绕地球三圈。

没有气质。太濃的化妆好像吧女。
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Guest Not_ZZY_Fan

Hope Zhang Ziyi sues Boxun News until they go bankrupt, they must pay for defaming others with baseless untruths and being shamelessly unrepentant about it.

Wow I'm surprised there's actually someone who's supporting this little money sucking sl*t. Come on, face it... For a decent girl who's so willing to trade herself in a open beach with the white guys (go find the old news), how many steps away from her hooking herself up for a large sum of money.... anyway, I'm never a fan of her, for someone with the acting skill of noting more than merely just trying to look innocent and lost all the time. If anyone watched one of the Margaret Cho stand up, Margaret was right, Zhang ZiYi looks like someone who needs to heavily rely on Mapquest.com 

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Guest Guest

《暴走吧,女人》讲述由五个女人野外暴走的故事,牵引出了都市女性的高压生活状态。五­个都市女人,均有着不为人知的苦恼和困惑。为了寻找心中的蓝天,为了寻找梦中的家园,­为了洗涤内心的郁闷,她们选择了一种近乎自虐的暴走攻略,于是她们走到了一起的故事。

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkqihKH6CiY

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  • 3 weeks later...

My latest Mainland Chinese hunk 李晨浩.

 

20121001033028-135579047.jpg

 

 

01300001053926134951431776473_s.jpg

e20139710530551623111bd521.jpg

鍾意就好,理佢男定女

 

never argue with the guests. let them bark all they want.

 

结缘不结

不解缘

 

After I have said what I wanna say, I don't care what you say.

 

看穿不说穿

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Guest Guest

《暴走吧,女人》讲述由五个女人野外暴走的故事,牵引出了都市女性的高压生活状态。五­个都市女人,均有着不为人知的苦恼和困惑。为了寻找心中的蓝天,为了寻找梦中的家园,­为了洗涤内心的郁闷,她们选择了一种近乎自虐的暴走攻略,于是她们走到了一起的故事。

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkqihKH6CiY

 

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My latest Mainland Chinese hunk 李晨浩.

Tis china guy is cute n bod very lean fit. I find many china guys actually quite cute n their bod also quite nice. Even commoners also can find cuties.

对自己好是一种幸福,

对别人好是一种积福。

 

Spend time counting your blessings,

not airing your complaints.

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no news and gossip, just sharing this matured china male newscaster 新闻男主播 called 邱启明. good looking and manly.

anyone's type? :B)

Indeed manly looking but he seems to be balding?!

对自己好是一种幸福,

对别人好是一种积福。

 

Spend time counting your blessings,

not airing your complaints.

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  • blowingwind changed the title to China Ban on sissy men
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